My practice, which is informed by emotional and philosophical considerations of grieving, is a reflection upon the reality of loss within life and an integration of this understanding. Loss is treated as a site of memory, and assumes a fluid representationalism that is both as fantastical and as practical an expression of grief as the viewer requires...Click here to read more

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My practice, which is informed by emotional and philosophical considerations of grieving, is a reflection upon the reality of loss within life and an integration of this understanding. Loss is treated as a site of memory, and assumes a fluid representationalism that is both as fantastical and as practical an expression of grief as the viewer requires.
The works on Mylar are large mixed-media drawings, which are a composite of reclaimed segments of abandoned drawings, layered images and expressive marks. The dialog that occurs among the constellated, encrypted symbols both examines and questions Western culture's ideas about grief. In my drawings, death and dying are performed by objects of antiquity, culturally specific rituals, reliquaries and diverse iconography. The imagery centres on symbols of landscape and of biomorphic organisms, human and animal, that relate aspects of suffering to physical experiences and memories. The passing of time, so important and mysterious in the process of grieving, is suggested by many means, including the layering of transparent materials such as Mylar.
The works are constructed mixed-media drawings on Mylar. Initially a work may seem abstract-a flurry of shape, scratch, and color; along with cut lines and the use of flat space. But closer examination shows recognizable forms: here is a feather, an ear, there a hand. Using biomorphic symbols-of human and animal the imagery resolves upon scrutiny, the landscapes discernible.
Socially, grief is a complicated process involving hiding and revealing profound, personal, uncontrollable transformation. Because our culture shuns weakness and the unknowable, the social dialog surrounding death and dying is often a suppressed dialog. Instead of shying away from an immanent process, I am exploring its numerous personal and social implications.